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Foxes

Discussion in 'Mythology & Folklore' started by Celtic Skogsra, 21 June 2015.

  1. Celtic Skogsra

    Celtic Skogsra Heroic Member


    Red lips hide your teeth
    And your tongue is rough like stone
    In your eyes are fire and frost
    Are you a woman or a fox?
    Wild and sly, you hunt by night
    Long sleeves hide your claws
    Playing lustfully with your prey
    Your mouth is red with blood.

    Rise now lust and rage desire
    Rush on upwards, 'sap' in stem
    Rise without a word of witchcraft
    Rush without the magic words!


    Beautiful, wicked and wild
    Skirt hem barely hides your tail.
    Luring, leading deep into the woodlands
    You're frenzied hunter's dance.
    Just when your clothes have fallen
    And your naked body I've seen
    You laugh and open your mouth
    Give me a deep love bite...

    Rise now lust and rage desire
    Rush on upwards, 'sap' in stem
    Rise without a word of witchcraft
    Rush without the magic words!
     
    Last edited: 6 March 2016
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  2. Celtic Skogsra

    Celtic Skogsra Heroic Member

    Looking back I don't believe I never answered this. In Tibet at least the leopard symbolises feminine wisdom whilst remaining connected to a warlike function; for a Mediterranean parallel think of Dionysios' ferocious maenads and their connection to the leopard. Earlier at Çatalhöyük there was already a sculpture of a goddess dressed in spotted leopard skins and riding a leopard. Despite the great antiquity of this site in modern Turkey it is attributable to a modern culture area and the continuity of religious imagery with that of later areal cultures are certain, for example, at Knossos. In the northern Mediterranean before the IEs and later, its original function was representative of the dangerous potnia theron. In Egypt the lioness had an equivalent function whilst the male leopard was associated to Seth, and it has been noted that in Mesopotamia feline animals possessed heraldic far more than religious symbolism. The leopard as a symbol of martial ferocity is found elsewhere, for example in China.
     
    Last edited: 5 March 2016
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  3. Celtic Skogsra

    Celtic Skogsra Heroic Member

    In the north the lynx assumes the symbolism of the leopard further south, so in a way it isn't really correct to take the leopard's absence from the north at face value. For that matter, the lynx symbolism extends as far south as Greece (late folklore Charos) though it was clearest in the name of Lugh (compare to Brythonic llewyn.) The PIE root *luk- references the animal's shining eyes but the lynx deity is a psychopomp. Lynx claws were also provided in Russian royal burial rites.
     
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  4. Celtic Skogsra

    Celtic Skogsra Heroic Member

    Returning to foxes: there is an interesting Mongolian myth of some interest. In it the fox was fathered in an impure way by Garuda who engendered nine foxes. One of whom was sent as a messenger by the Seven Stars of the Plough to warn three brothers (Tibetan, Chinese and Mongol) not to bury their female ancestor among the stars of the Plough. However the fox forgot the message and so the dead woman was buried among the Plough creating such defilements the Gods were unable to preserve humans from afflictions. The fox was killed as a sinner and sacrifice was made with the parts of his body.
     
  5. Myrddin

    Myrddin Senior Member

    :cool: Hoping this will bring the Mythology Mistress from slumber.

    Concerning foxes here are some Celtic/Druidic attributions. The coat of the fox was highly valued by the Celts. Although they where hunted for their pelts,there is good evidence that such hunting was a ritualized activity and that the fox was considered sacred. At a iron age ritual pit in Hampshire a red deer and 12 foxes where buried. Apparently these ritual burials have been found at different sites in England and France. In common with the otter it is said to carry a magic pearl that brings good fortune to those who find it. Gaelic name Sionnach Hmmm "When the Feast of Brighid (Imbolc) is past ,the fox won't trust his tail to ice"(Scottish folk saying) symbolizes diplomacy,cunning,wildness
     
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  6. Celtic Skogsra

    Celtic Skogsra Heroic Member

    It would be nice to have references: a lot of Celtic lore is invented or retconned by antiquarians.
     
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  7. Myrddin

    Myrddin Senior Member

    OBOD related literature Mostly mentioned the archaeological stuff I found cuz I agree with you.
     
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  8. Celtic Skogsra

    Celtic Skogsra Heroic Member

    I should try to write more on foxes. And dragons: d'Huy wrote about dragons.

    If I wrote a collection of retold fox stories and an introduction, would you buy it and would it be possible to do so anonymously?
     
  9. Myrddin

    Myrddin Senior Member

    Would definitely buy it:D Sure you could get it done.
     
  10. Celtic Skogsra

    Celtic Skogsra Heroic Member

    Well I am a content producer. Just one with poor net access.

    Should add dogs and the like but I like fox myths and legends from Japan, England etc.