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Mormonism and the LDS movement

Discussion in 'Religion & Spirituality' started by Bun, 1 December 2014.

  1. Bun

    Bun Member

    I had a friend who was raised Protestant and converted to Mormonism. Was very into it's historical teachings and would say things like "we're the real Masons" and such. Even considered Muhammad a prophet. We spent many hours discussing Mormonism.

    Anyway, from what I know of the doctrines, I view Mormonism, despite it's recent watering-down and attempt to be "legitimized" in the public sphere and perceived as a Christian denomination (Mormons aren't Christians, which both my friend and most Christian priests: Catholic, Orthodox, Protestant, or otherwise would agree with) as an inbetween of the Aryan-solar and Semitic-lunar spiritual traditions. Or, the Aryanization of Christianity. Especially given it's greater virility and warlike historical roots.

    Aryan-solar spirituality holds, roughly, that men are descended from the gods or doesn't draw as distinct a separation between them. The Aryo-Buddhist tradition has a story where Price Siddhartha visits and confronts the supreme Brahma himself and declares himself, despite his threats of being cast into a lake of fire and other punishments, like, he claims, ascetics who came before him, superior to him, and ultimately prevails due to perseverance. The Stoic-Hellenic tradition declares that (according to Epictetus, IIRC) men like Diogenes of Sinope were "rightfully called gods" and that they were fit to live with then at the Pantheon. Seneca even stated in a letter that the only difference between men and gods is time.

    The Semitic-lunar tradition holds essentially that, to paraphrase a Jewish book I once read while attending a Synagogue, "men must humble themselves and their puny intelligence before the almighty".

    The LDS belief system (which Mormonism is apart of) seems to fit roughly in-between these two extremes. Essentially, that Humans are the descendants of Heavenly Father and his multiple wives who, should they adhere and live according to LDS doctrine, become gods and continue to have children in the next-life who will populate other worlds or alternate universes, just as Heavenly Father, who was once born a Human, did prior to becoming this world or universe's god.

    Seeing as Mormonism holds that revelations haven't stopped since Jesus's time, this growing tradition may lead to some interesting future developments. Perhaps even a splintering into further Aryanized sects.

    I'm not a scholar in these fields and hopefully haven't misrepresented these traditions' views too grossly.

    Thoughts?
     
    Last edited: 1 December 2014
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  2. The Fool

    The Fool Second Lieutenant Sustaining Member
    1. Lumine Boreali Gentlemen's Club
    2. Neoplatonism

    If your primary concern about a religion is whether or not it flatters humanity by being "solar", and not whether or not it makes any sense, then sure, Mormonism sounds good.
     
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  3. Raisin

    Raisin Senior Member Staff Member

    Although, to be fair, "flattering humanity" can be taken to mean 'Not denigrating humanity,' depending on the context.
     
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  4. Plantagenet

    Plantagenet Heroic Member

    Though to be truly solar is to transcend humanity into the "more-than-human" element within ourselves, so it wouldn't really be flattering humanity but rather holding that the human state is something to be moved beyond, in many cases professing that the human state, while a precious state for achieving this aim, is not the ultimate one. Humanism, especially of the atheistic variety, is often the most flattering of the human state.

    That said, I don't know much about Mormonism other than it seems a bit zany. From what little I know of their notions of becoming gods, I think it is more an immanent/material notion of being a god, lording over a planet, rather than a truly transcendent notion of godhood one might find in Plotinus for example. Though I do like their old racial policies and they seem from my observations to be an upstanding community with many traditional values.

    If I were going to be Christian (or a pseudo-Christian like the Mormons) I'd stick with the German mystical tradition running through Meister Eckhart, Tauler, and Cusanus down through Boehme, Angelus Silesius, Eckartshausen, and Franz Xaver von Baader.
     
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  5. The Fool

    The Fool Second Lieutenant Sustaining Member
    1. Lumine Boreali Gentlemen's Club
    2. Neoplatonism

    Well, in that case, (proper) Christianity is totally solar, so you're using the terminology differently to how Bun is using it.
     
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  6. Bun

    Bun Member

    Are you referring to the Eastern Orthodox notion of "theosis"?
     
  7. The Fool

    The Fool Second Lieutenant Sustaining Member
    1. Lumine Boreali Gentlemen's Club
    2. Neoplatonism

    Yes, but not only that, I mean the entire Christian idea of salvation. There has arisen the idea among many pseudo-Christians that paradise is like how the Muslims conceive of it, as a base reward of material goods in exchange for the observance of rules. As Duns Scotus put it:

    What will the Saracens, disciples of that most worthless swine Mohammed, allege for their scriptures, expecting for beatitude, as they do, what befits swine and asses, namely sated gullet and coitus?

    This is incorrect. A Christian does not follow rules in exchange for a reward in this base way, he conforms himself to God and becomes akin to God, and in so doing becomes fit to stand in the presence of God, which is paradise.
     
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  8. Pangloss

    Pangloss Senior Member

    I see the Subtle Doctor is gaining popularity here! Though this rather material and base conception of the after life always set off alarm bells (I rather like the way the Talmud [I forget which one] where it tells mankind not to try and conceive the afterlife, or try and guess what it is in material terms, as "no eye hath seen it" ).

    I once had a Sufi acquaintance constantly performing Dawah on me by claiming there will be banana and pineapple flavoured weed and dancing girls - as heaven is what ever you want. To be fair, he does claim to have seen the face of God when he was whirling - so he was perfectly apt with theological linguistics - so I wont put it down to language problems arising from trying to describe divine things with recourse to experience only gathered within a material realm - but he seemed to be implying that his material description of the after life was to be taken in a literal sense. The other side is turned is degenerated into pure hedonism.
     
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  9. Raisin

    Raisin Senior Member Staff Member

    A certain Professor relayed to me that this materialist conception of Muhammadanism could easily be turned against itself; For example, Islamic tradition states that Paradise, - alongside the copious amounts of wine, - presents you with 'brown eyed and dark haired beauties'... But what if you're European, and like blondes or redheads? Certainly, Islamic paradise would be perdition.
     
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  10. The Fool

    The Fool Second Lieutenant Sustaining Member
    1. Lumine Boreali Gentlemen's Club
    2. Neoplatonism

    It almost gives you the impression that Mahomet was simply a barbaric warlord with a very inventive way of gaining followers, doesn't it?

    Why would one need weed and girls when one is in ecstatic communion with God?
     
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