Neanderthal Bear Cultism in the Paleolithic

Discussion in 'Anthropology' started by Arboreality, 21 September 2018.

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Neanderthal Bear Cultism in the Paleolithic

  1. This doesn't sound plausible at all.

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  2. It could be a possibility, but I'd need more evidence to be sure.

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  3. This is definitely plausible, I believe that this is true.

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  4. I've known that something like this was true for a while.

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  5. This is true, but this is just the tip of the iceberg, think bigger.

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  6. I'm not sure.

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  1. Arboreality

    Arboreality Member

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    This is something I've always found to be strangely interesting. In general, prehistoric religion gives you a lot of interesting insights. For those who aren't familiar, there is a theory put forward by Emil Bächler after excavating the Drachenloch cave in eastern Switzerland. He found the arranged skeletal remains of an extinct bear species known as Ursus spelaeus, also known as the cave bear. It was a large and particularly intelligent variety of bear that mainly lived in caves, so finding its remains there wasn't too weird.

    However, the skull and leg bones were arranged into formations that looked very deliberate. One such skull had a femur penetrating its cheek, an arrangement that Bächler thought only possible if the femur is turned as it is pushed in. These arrangements were extremely unlikely to be naturally occurring. Therefore, his conclusion was that he had discovered a very early shrine dedicated to this the cave bear of Europe's caves. Bächler estimated the period during which the cave would have been accessible (i.e. not blocked by Ice Age glaciers) while the bear existed was well over 100,000 years ago.

    Later on André Leroi-Gourhan would find the exact arrangements all the way in Saône-et-Loire. Although, it's worth noting that Gourhan himself was skeptical and considered the arrangements to be just an extreme fluke of flooding and other happenstance. Nonetheless, this could, and in the minds of some, does imply the existence of an ancient cult of Neanderthals that was spread over a fairly large distance. There is definitely motive for some in the mainstream to debunk this, and I want to talk more about that in other posts. However, I'd like to hear what you have to say. Feel free to share similar paradigms.
     
  2. Manu

    Manu Señor Member Sustaining Member
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    This is a bit of a conundrum for me. Do we come from neanderthals in part? Or were they the ones that formed the basis for white people when we were created and popped out of nowhere as Cro Magnon? Complete with stories of Atlantis and all that. It is a piece of the puzzle that I am not quite sure about what to make of, modern anthropology being what it is, nothing is reliable. To be honest I have lots of pieces but not the entire picture. Maybe no one does. Too many jews with an agenda in controlling positions when it comes to neanderthals in particular. Varg Vikernes made a video about that a while back, and I can't say I can fault his scepticism on those grounds. If history for the last thousands of years has something to teach it is never to trust in anything where jews are concerned. There is always one or many harmful agendas. One thing about the neanderthals is that they seem to have possessed the inventiveness, thtat aryan spark and soul, that has since then been the hallmark of the european peoples and no one else.
     
  3. Arboreality

    Arboreality Member

    It's very difficult to accurately study the past along with to some extent the future in a Modern age where the present is held to be the most important and even the most, "real." Prehistory is on another level altogether, and so is our distant mythical past. I wouldn't feel confident making any sort of absolute statements. The best we can do is compare various Traditional paradigms, but even those have been corrupted to some extent over the millennia. You also need to be able to read between the lines when it comes mainstream science, but of course there are complications there as well.

    To sum up my views on the Neanderthals, I'd say that there are many people walking around today with at least some Neanderthal DNA heritage in them, In much of history and even in mythology we have references to particular Neanderthals who had a big impact. Those with this DNA tend to be much more creative, conscious, lucid, higher-willed, and leadership-oriented. I think that there is more Neanderthal in us than is generally acknowledged. However, this is mainly in northern Eurasia, particularly in the regions the Neanderthals were most distributed. Without this DNA you're what Serrano would call a, "man-ant."

    The mainstream has a lot of things wrong about the Neanderthals, that much is certain. It was only recently that they'd even acknowledge that they weren't mute, savage cannibals. Thus, the association of the word with brutishness and/or stupidity. This is why Traditionalists don't like Darwinism that much, at least as a metaphysical model, because it tends to be used to justify a linear view of history of lower-to-higher states. Of course, the truth about biological evolution is that it's not a linear process at all, and has metaphysical implications that complement Traditionalism moreso than they complement Modernity. I will make posts about these topics in the future.
     
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