The general book thread

Discussion in 'Literature' started by Olavsson, 6 October 2013.

  1. Olavsson

    Olavsson First Lieutenant Staff Member
    1. Lumine Boreali Gentlemen's Club
    2. Neoplatonism

    Tell us which book(s) you are currently reading, or list up the books that you most recently bought. Any book you once read and would like us to know about? Post it here.

    Note that if you are writing a more extensive post about a particular book, it would be better if you created a separate thread for this in order to make it easier for people to find it. This thread is for shorter comments concerning books.
     
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  2. Well, I'm currently studying German so I shouldn't be reading books in English ;(

    But anyways, I recently bought and am currently reading (although I shouldn't be, because they are in English):

    • The Secret Teachings of All Ages by Manly P. Hall - one of the best books I have perused so far. It's simply fantastic - recommended/required reading for anyone who is interested in tradition and symbolism.
    • Gnosis - The Nature & History by Kurt Rudolph
    Currently reading in e-format:
    • For My Legionaires by Corneliu Codreanu - very inspiring, if one takes some parts with a grain of salt
    • Beowulf (Lesslie Hall translation)
    • Die Identitäre Generation by Markus Willinger - already read most of it in English, but reading it again to practice my German
     
    Last edited: 6 October 2013
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  3. Olavsson

    Olavsson First Lieutenant Staff Member
    1. Lumine Boreali Gentlemen's Club
    2. Neoplatonism

    The last book I ordered (haven't received it yet) is the Hagakure, a Japanese text about the Samurai ethos authored by a Samurai in the 1700s. It was very popular in Japan during the Second World War, and was apparently one of the most beloved books for the famous author (and Japanese nationalist and traditionalist) Yukio Mishima. The book is typically known for its philosophical focus on continually living with death and its crucial role for the warrior. For nobody is the awareness of the central element of death in life more obvious than to the warrior, as he has accepted more than anyone else how each day may be his last, and that leads to living with a higher level of intensity and vitality. It will surely be interesting to check out more in-depth what this text has to offer. Even though Japan belongs to a distant civilization, their traditional warrior ethos is in many ways related to our own.
     
    Last edited: 6 October 2013
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  4. Plantagenet

    Plantagenet Heroic Member

    I often find I can't read one book at a time but rather skip around between 2-4. Currently I am reading Philosophy and Theurgy in Late Antiquity by Algis Uzdavinys, the medieval Hindu text Yoga Vasistha, and briefly started reading some of Henry Corbin's The Man of Light in Iranian Sufism.

    Prior to these I had just completed reading the scripture Tripura Rahasya: The Secret of the Supreme Goddess and re-reading Mark Dyczkowski's excellent book The Doctrine of Vibration. I recommend any of these books for those interested in these subjects.
     
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  5. Plantagenet

    Plantagenet Heroic Member

    Currently I am juggling three books. The Teachings and Practices of the Early Quanzhen Taoist Masters by Stephen Eskildsen, Cultivating Perfection: Mysticism and Self-transformation in Early Quanzhen Daoism by Louis Komjathy, and The Doctrine of Deification in the Greek Patristic Tradition by Norman Russell.

    Regarding the first two books, it always fascinates me that no matter how much I read on various religious traditions, I always manage to find more traditions and sages than I previously knew existed. The case of the Quanzhen (meaning Complete Perfection, sometimes translated as Complete Reality) Daoist tradition is one of these. I was overall ignorant of the tradition, and I didn't realize its depths. It is currently the main Daoist community in China, though who knows what sort of state it is in after the ravages of the Cultural Revolution.

    As to the third, it seems from what I've read so far to be a great overview of the origins and development of the doctrine of theosis, starting with Apostles and Alexandrian fathers and moving along until one reaches Pseudo-Dionysius and Maximus the Confessor.
     
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  6. The Fool

    The Fool Second Lieutenant Sustaining Member
    1. Lumine Boreali Gentlemen's Club
    2. Neoplatonism

    The last book I read was Lothrop Stoddard's The Rising Tide of Color. What I have on my shelf to read next is Meditations on the Tarot, The Conduct of War 1789-1961 by JFC Fuller, A Second Look at the Second Coming by TL Frazier and a collection of writings by Anthony Ludovici titled The Lost Philosopher, published by Counter-Currents.
     
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  7. Mojave

    Mojave Senior Member

    Various Mishima titles, most recently "Patriotism," a fairly short work dealing with honor and the Bushido code. "Stahlgewittern" by Ernst Junger is sometimes called the nationalistic yin to Remarque's yang as to first hand WWI experience (Junger retained his standing thru and beyond the NS period- even, I have read, becoming a favorite of Helmut Kohl).
     
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  8. Bellerophon

    Bellerophon Senior Member

    Finished Spengler's Decline of the West a couple weeks ago, now started on Guenon's The Crisis of the Modern World and noticing similarities between the vernacular of Evola.
     
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  9. Plantagenet

    Plantagenet Heroic Member

    I'm ashamed to say I have yet to read Spengler. For one who is familiar with Evola and Guenon, is Spengler still worth a read?

    As for me, earlier this week I was reading various excerpts of the Philokalia to get some insights into Orthodox Christian ascetic practices. As a sort of random decision, the past few days I've been reading some material on my favorite (or one of my favorite) forms of Buddhism, Shingon. So I started re-reading Taiko Yamasaki's "Shingon: Japanese Esoteric Buddhism", excerpts from the great Avatamsaka Sutra, and Ryuchi Abe's "The Weaving of Mantra."
     
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  10. Bellerophon

    Bellerophon Senior Member

    I would be inclined to say yes, if only for potentially sharing an alternative perspective on the Right for people who are less inclined to the overtly metaphysical.
    Spengler's ideas differ from the Perennial School, being more Nietzschean and 'socially Darwinistic' than mystical or spiritual, although with an underlying implication of a higher order or design. Being a polymath in his own right, his Weltanschauung (at least in Decline) can be a hassle to digest on first contact; it has the potential to be quite rewarding and insightful, adding a plethora of coined terms and dynamics to contemplate, if you can stick through the hefty tome. :D
    I find his ideas complementing Guenon, in regards to cycles of cultures/civilizations within the larger spiritual degradation phase of the present Kali Yuga, our Middle Ages being a brief reprieve from this regression.
     
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